Friday, June 12, 2015

America’s war on Black girls: Why McKinney police violence isn’t about “one bad apple”


In just over two months, we will commemorate the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, a natural disaster that ravaged communities along the Gulf Coast. This tragedy was made infinitely worse not only by decades of governmental neglect and far-ranging poverty, but also by the fact that so many Black people could not swim.

Contrary to the lines of some stand-up comedians and popular stereotype folklore, the large numbers of Blacks that can't swim has nothing to do with preservation of hair styles or fear of water. That nearly 60 percent of Black people cannot swim is directly attributable to decades of segregated pool facilities in this country. While that problem ostensibly went away with the desegregation efforts of the mid-20th century, de facto segregation of pool facilities persists to this day, because community pools are now largely private amenities in suburban neighborhoods that many Black youths don’t have access to. Follow where this lead in is going @ America’s war on Black girls: Why McKinney police violence isn’t about “one bad apple”

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